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The Issues We Care About

 

FIGHTING FOR WHAT’s RIGHT

Public lands are our birthright. They belong to every person regardless of race, income, gender, or zip code. Our public lands sustain fish and wildlife, clean air and water, and tell the stories of human habitation. But too many of our communities are left out of the decision-making process of how these lands are managed. Similarly, too many of our communities are left without access to basic outdoor recreation opportunities and experiences in urban areas. A person’s per capita household income should not determine whether we get to enjoy clean air, water, and outdoor recreation. These are the issues we’re working on.

 
 

TELLING THE FULL STORY OF WHO ENJOYS THE OUTDOORS

Outdoor recreation is varied, and both consumptive and non-consumptive land users should be honored and respected. As our Hispanic and Latino communities are multilingual and multicultural, the way we enjoy the outdoors is also multifaceted. From fishing, hunting, rafting, climbing, birding, hiking, picnicking, horseback riding or wildlife watching, we do it all. And we want to make sure that those uses are respected.

 

EQUITABLE ACCESS AND TRANSPORTATION TO OUTDOOR RECREATION

Too many low-income youth and their families are left behind when it comes to enjoying the outdoors. In many neighborhoods, lack of public transportation to outdoor places impacts peoples’ ability to enjoy the outdoors. In other cases, the lack of urban parks or heavily industrialized neighborhoods diminish the opportunities to go outside or enjoy clean air and water. And within our social institutions, many nonprofit organizations and local governments simply don’t have the funding to support outdoor recreation programs.

 

PROTECTING THE ORGAN MOUNTAIN-DESERT PEAKS NATIONAL MONUMENT

Southern New Mexicans fought hard to establish the Organ Mountains Desert Peaks National Monument. Together with our partners at Friends of Organ Mountains Desert Peaks, we’re working with the Bureau of Land Management and the surrounding communities to ensure the BLM develops an inclusive and adequate Resource Management Plan for the new national monument. We’re also engaging hundreds of youth and local families in Las Cruces by taking them out to the monument each year.

 

STOPPING THE BORDER WALL

The President’s continued threat to build a "massive" border wall between the United States and Mexico disregards the rich bi-national cultural history of the US-Mexico border, including in New Mexico. Mexico is our neighbor and we should honor the culture and people that have been here long before the drawing of the US-Mexico boundaries. Additionally, a border wall would do irreparable damage to Chihuahuan and Sonoran desert ecosystems and wildlife corridors across the Rio Grande Valley. We will continue to educate New Mexicans and advocate against this destructive proposition.